Do you have to write a lot in the written sections?

I know as a rule, it is quality over quantity but all of the example answers are really lengthy and i feel like they are just repeating themselves in different ways when what they have written in 4 or 5 paragraphs could have been condensed to 1 or 2 paragraphs?

Answers

  • CornishPixieCornishPixie Posts: 105Registered, MAAT, AATQB, AAT Licensed Accountant
    I guess that would depend on the command verbs in the question!

    If the question asked you to describe something, then you would be expected to give the main characteristics, details and qualities of something - and relate that to the question in hand. Likewise, if you were asked to analyse something, then you would be expected to separate this into its main component parts, identifying their characteristics and then show how these relate to the question in hand.

    These are all explained in the writing skills e-learning on the AAT website when I took this last year - definitely worth a look.

    So, yes, there could well be a lot of writing involved if you want to get as many points as possible. Obviously, if you don't know your command verbs, you are likely to get zero marks as any feedback would just say you did not answer the question set (been there and got the T-shirt)! And don't forget to refer to the pre-release material.
  • gabriellenlewisgabriellenlewis Posts: 128AAT Student
    > @CornishPixie said:
    > I guess that would depend on the command verbs in the question!
    >
    > If the question asked you to describe something, then you would be expected to give the main characteristics, details and qualities of something - and relate that to the question in hand. Likewise, if you were asked to analyse something, then you would be expected to separate this into its main component parts, identifying their characteristics and then show how these relate to the question in hand.
    >
    > These are all explained in the writing skills e-learning on the AAT website when I took this last year - definitely worth a look.
    >
    > So, yes, there could well be a lot of writing involved if you want to get as many points as possible. Obviously, if you don't know your command verbs, you are likely to get zero marks as any feedback would just say you did not answer the question set (been there and got the T-shirt)! And don't forget to refer to the pre-release material.

    Thanks! I think I do know my command words , I still just find I could be a lot more concise than some of the examples.

    When you say be sure to refer to pre-release material— do you mean for the CBA /SWOT analysis questions , not questions where a case study is already given?
  • CornishPixieCornishPixie Posts: 105Registered, MAAT, AATQB, AAT Licensed Accountant
    I would suggest all questions, except of course the multiple choice and the ratios where there are set answers. When I took this a year ago, I could still link the pre-release material to all remaining questions. Make sure you know the strengths and weaknesses of the company. These can easily be linked with any of your decisions as part of your argument. Knowing them beforehand enables you to quickly remember them and include them as evidence.
  • gabriellenlewisgabriellenlewis Posts: 128AAT Student
    > @CornishPixie said:
    > I would suggest all questions, except of course the multiple choice and the ratios where there are set answers. When I took this a year ago, I could still link the pre-release material to all remaining questions. Make sure you know the strengths and weaknesses of the company. These can easily be linked with any of your decisions as part of your argument. Knowing them beforehand enables you to quickly remember them and include them as evidence.

    Thank you. I’m a little confused because the pre-release case study is different to the case study given in the actual exam, no?
  • CornishPixieCornishPixie Posts: 105Registered, MAAT, AATQB, AAT Licensed Accountant
    Have you taken the synoptic before?
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