Why are the vast majority of AATers very weak at maths?

*Data Input* officer
*Data Input* officer Registered Posts: 59 ? ? ?
Intelligence, ignorance, a combination of both, or other?

Comments

  • Sonny_L
    Sonny_L Registered Posts: 201 ? ? ?
    I am A grade Maths and Physics at A level, as were a couple on my course. But many had A levels and degrees in completely different subjects which did not disadvantage them at all. Accountancy and maths are two different subjects.

    There are also multiple forms of intelligence. Logical, mathematics type intelligence is not the be all and end all.

    Why have you decided to troll today?
  • blank
    blank Registered Posts: 6 Regular contributor ⭐ ? ⭐
    its an accountancy course the level of maths required is below GCSE level, even at ACCA level it only scraps AS level and i have maths, physics and further maths at a level
  • welshwizard
    welshwizard Registered Posts: 465
    So long as you know the method for calculation, maths is not really required, just knowledge of how to use a calculator.

    Troll off!
  • Westfalianlover
    Westfalianlover Registered Posts: 8 Regular contributor ⭐ ? ⭐
    I am rubbish at maths. But as others have said as long as you know the calculations and know your way around a calculator you should be fine:001_smile:. I dont think it matters whether your good at maths or not.
  • SandyHood
    SandyHood Registered, Moderator Posts: 2,034
    I haven't met even half the people who are AAT qualified, but I see over 200 candidates prior to each exam.
    If your question is based on facts, then I am very fortunate.

    Based on my experience, I have found a small number of candidates who are weak at maths but I have also found a vast majority who can do maths and do maths well.

    Given your apparent expertise at maths, please could you tell me whether you tested everyone, or a sample? If it was a sample, how large was the sample that you used?
    Sandy
    [email protected]
    www.sandyhood.com
  • blobbyh
    blobbyh Registered Posts: 2,415
    I don't think there's much point anyone further answering the OP's question as it was a trolling thread to begin with. I'm also not sure if Data Input Officer is still an active member of the forums following the tirade they launched elsewhere at the time...
  • speegs
    speegs Registered Posts: 854
    Maths was never really my strong point, however when I started (and completed) my AAT qualification I found this helped my maths to no end. But you should not forget that accountancy is not all about maths. Yes I need to be able to press buttons on a calculator and calculate ratios, but I also need to be able to interpret the information and that is half the battle. Once I had figured out what the information was telling me, the maths fell into place.

    I now tutor my nephew in maths. Although I am not a qualified maths teacher neither is the teacher he currently has. My nephew is a film star (litterally) and spends most of his time on film sets with a useless tutor who cannot tell one end of his chalk from the other. I have ended up boosting my nephews knowledge.

    Speegs

    PS I am not telling anyone who my nephew is (confidientiality).
  • Cullen
    Cullen Registered Posts: 592
    I bet your nephew is.....

    Harry Potter???????
  • Cullen
    Cullen Registered Posts: 592
    Or little Liam from Shameless?
  • SalinaA
    SalinaA Registered Posts: 35 ? ? ?
    I have never been good at maths but have always passed accounts and numeracy tests! Hasn't affectred my ability in an accounts role!

    I think uit is different and as long as you can use a calculator you are fine :001_smile:
  • blobbyh
    blobbyh Registered Posts: 2,415
    As I said before this was a trolling thread to start with and the OP doesn't look like they're around any longer to read the replies anyway...

    ... but...

    ... the difference here is that accountants generally use a higher working standard of arithmatic (i.e. the four symbols + - * & / ) rather than mathematics (i.e. algebra, algorythms and logarythms etc) though most non-numeric people don't distinguish between the two.
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