Your plans during and

Portsmouth_AATPortsmouth_AAT Feels At HomeRegistered Posts: 96
Just out of interest (yes im nosey) but just wondered what kind of jobs AAT studiers/qualified are in? and plans for the future

On some threads people disclose this, but it intrigues me as to why people study? Career goals short and long term? aims? achievements? where it takes them etc. :confused1:

I originally got into AAT as I wanted a career change I was in a call centre job with no job satisfaction and no real career. Originally I studied horse management at college after school but after a few good years of partying and studying of course I realised there was no money to be made in horses unless you have a lot of funds behind you!! Gutted!!

My long term goal now is to get into practice for a while and hopefully be able to start my own business one day, have a nice house out of town and be able to have horses back as a hobby! No time at the moment stops me!!

Short term I am an IT management accountant, I have been very luck to be able to progress within the same job i worked in the call centre for, but not without a lot of hard work on my part. I am nearly AAT qualified (one exam left!) and recently brought my first property!! :001_smile:

I do have big ideas and plans but have always been this way and its part of whats got me where i am today!! If you dont believe in yourself then it will never happen!!! I believe everything in life happens for a reason so if my plan doesn't work out then it wasnt meant to be!!:thumbup:

Comments

  • blobbyhblobbyh Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,415
    I believe everything in life happens for a reason so if my plan doesn't work out then it wasnt meant to be!!:thumbup:

    I hate that phrase as it's so overly optimistic! Pessimists will initally think the same but then study it, learn why the failure happened and then try to make sure it doesn't happen again!

    Pessimists change the world while optimists just blindly court disaster and then flap when it strikes.

    Sorry, bit off topic, I know.
  • messedup89messedup89 Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 1,281
    blobbyh wrote: »
    I hate that phrase as it's so overly optimistic! Pessimists will initally think the same but then study it, learn why the failure happened and then try to make sure it doesn't happen again!

    Pessimists change the world while optimists just blindly court disaster and then flap when it strikes.

    Sorry, bit off topic, I know.

    what about realists?
  • blobbyhblobbyh Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,415
    While you might think realists are in between the two, I'd say realists are often the opposite extreme of optimists and just accept things for the way they are.

    Pessimists enforce change by disbelieving something that's long been accepted and spend the rest of their lives beavering away to prove they're (usually) right.

    The best combination to have would be 50% P, 20% R, 20% O, 10% insanity.
  • messedup89messedup89 Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 1,281
    blobbyh wrote: »
    While you might think realists are in between the two, I'd say realists are often the opposite extreme of optimists and just accept things for the way they are.

    Pessimists enforce change by disbelieving something that's long been accepted and spend the rest of their lives beavering away to prove they're (usually) right.

    The best combination to have would be 50% P, 20% R, 20% O, 10% insanity.

    if i was 50% pessemistic i'd be depressed about half my life and thats not right :thumbdown:
  • Portsmouth_AATPortsmouth_AAT Feels At Home Registered Posts: 96
    I am a positive person and think that being negative doesnt help anyone or thing!!

    And i dont flap when things go wrong, I just asses the situation and plan the way forward!! you need ambitions in life and if they dont quite get met then make sure you have fun trying!!! :thumbup1:
  • blobbyhblobbyh Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,415
    Why do people mistakenly assume that pessimists just give up when they see something not right? I'm a pessimist - and arguably so should be all accountants - but it doesn't mean I don't have the power of change within me.

    Failing company owners are often good examples of eternal optimists who refuse to accept the inevitability of a dire situation, blindly believing things will get better. A pessimistic owner may tend to believe the worst, try to keep an eye on everything, employ the best people and thus improve the situation for those around him (even if not for himself).

    As I said the best mix is to have a mix of all three but if we can't ever see failure coming then we can't plan or prepare for it.
  • messedup89messedup89 Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 1,281
    blobbyh wrote: »
    Why do people mistakenly assume that pessimists just give up when they see something not right? I'm a pessimist - and arguably so should be all accountants - but it doesn't mean I don't have the power of change within me.

    Failing company owners are often good examples of eternal optimists who refuse to accept the inevitability of a dire situation, blindly believing things will get better. A pessimistic owner may tend to believe the worst, try to keep an eye on everything, employ the best people and thus improve the situation for those around him (even if not for himself).

    As I said the best mix is to have a mix of all three but if we can't ever see failure coming then we can't plan or prepare for it.

    i agree, a mix of all 3. But not 50& pessimist, too much of thinking the worst
  • CJCCJC Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 1,657
    Optimist: The glass is half full
    Pessimist: The glass is half empty.
    Accountant: The glass is operating at 50% efficiency; recommend increasing glass utilisation or reducing glass capacity.
  • messedup89messedup89 Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 1,281
    CJC wrote: »
    Optimist: The glass is half full
    Pessimist: The glass is half empty.
    Accountant: The glass is operating at 50% efficiency; recommend increasing glass utilisation or reducing glass capacity.

    lol :001_tt1: it :thumbup:
  • sharonjsharonj Well-Known Registered Posts: 166
    blobbyh wrote: »
    Why do people mistakenly assume that pessimists just give up when they see something not right? I'm a pessimist - and arguably so should be all accountants - but it doesn't mean I don't have the power of change within me.

    Failing company owners are often good examples of eternal optimists who refuse to accept the inevitability of a dire situation, blindly believing things will get better. A pessimistic owner may tend to believe the worst, try to keep an eye on everything, employ the best people and thus improve the situation for those around him (even if not for himself).

    As I said the best mix is to have a mix of all three but if we can't ever see failure coming then we can't plan or prepare for it.

    To say that a pessimist will pick themselves up and try to find out why things went wrong is not necessarily true. An optimist, when faced with a situation that hasn't gone their way will think 'ok so what can we do to make this situation work', whereas a pessimist will think 'I knew that would go wrong, why did I bother??'

    I personally believe that if you are 100% pessimist as you say you are, even if you totally look at everything with a pessimistic attitude you will never be happy with your life. Where is the point in that? I can understand being pessimistic when referring to accounts and having to err on the side of caution when it comes to the financial state of a business but is that anyway to look at your entire life in general. A person who doesn't take any risk, ever, will lead a very risk free, dull and pessimistically dreary life. But then again if you truly are 100% pessimist you would have expected that and nothing more.:001_rolleyes:
  • sharonjsharonj Well-Known Registered Posts: 166
    Just out of interest (yes im nosey) but just wondered what kind of jobs AAT studiers/qualified are in? and plans for the future

    On some threads people disclose this, but it intrigues me as to why people study? Career goals short and long term? aims? achievements? where it takes them etc. :confused1:

    I originally got into AAT as I wanted a career change I was in a call centre job with no job satisfaction and no real career. Originally I studied horse management at college after school but after a few good years of partying and studying of course I realised there was no money to be made in horses unless you have a lot of funds behind you!! Gutted!!

    My long term goal now is to get into practice for a while and hopefully be able to start my own business one day, have a nice house out of town and be able to have horses back as a hobby! No time at the moment stops me!!

    Short term I am an IT management accountant, I have been very luck to be able to progress within the same job i worked in the call centre for, but not without a lot of hard work on my part. I am nearly AAT qualified (one exam left!) and recently brought my first property!! :001_smile:

    I do have big ideas and plans but have always been this way and its part of whats got me where i am today!! If you dont believe in yourself then it will never happen!!! I believe everything in life happens for a reason so if my plan doesn't work out then it wasnt meant to be!!:thumbup:

    Hi

    I totally agree with the attitude you have and that everything happens for a reason and is most definately meant to be. If you work hard at something and give it everything you've got and it still doesn't work out then you move on. If you're not happy with your life, you try and change things for the better. Looking at things optimistically you will always be able to say you had the right attitude and gave it everything you've got. Optimists are usually hardworking and willing to give anything they feel passionately a try. If you fail, at least you tried.

    In answer to your initial thread posted, I too wanted a complete change of career. I'm only studying the advanced certificate at the moment, having worked in banking for 15 years in the city, I'm hoping that by the time my children have their own children (thinking about the long term future here), I hope to be working for myself at home and not having to travel up to town to work. I personally hate working in the city and cannot wait to be able to work away from the square mile. :thumbup1:
  • steveJsteveJ Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 694
    I start a goal with the picture in my mind of what im are aiming for i.e big house, car, own business, passing all exams . Just keep it in the forefront of my mind and just carry on with every day life and gradually things will show themselves, but you must be ready to notice them.

    That's where learning comes in - reading, listening, seminars etc.

    Its not what happens outside of yourself that affects you it is what you do about it.

    Portsmouth you have definately got the right idea and I agree with you completely.
  • BuffBuff Trusted Regular Registered Posts: 275
    I like pessimist because you can make Piss Times :-)
  • Chris023Chris023 Feels At Home Registered Posts: 93
    I am at a bit of a crossroads. Accounts is all I know, I have been in it since my A-levels. I have just become MAAT. However I am finding accounts increasingly boring & it is not what I really want to do with the rest of my career. However how many of us actually have a job that we like and is interesting?

    I am unsure whether to try ACCA or not - my heart is not really in it but I feel that I don't want my AAT to go to waste...& ACCA (at least completing the fundamental level) would be an excellent thing to fall back on. If in a few years time I do attempt a career change and it all goes belly up!
  • Portsmouth_AATPortsmouth_AAT Feels At Home Registered Posts: 96
    Chris023 wrote: »
    I am at a bit of a crossroads. Accounts is all I know, I have been in it since my A-levels. I have just become MAAT. However I am finding accounts increasingly boring & it is not what I really want to do with the rest of my career. However how many of us actually have a job that we like and is interesting?

    I am unsure whether to try ACCA or not - my heart is not really in it but I feel that I don't want my AAT to go to waste...& ACCA (at least completing the fundamental level) would be an excellent thing to fall back on. If in a few years time I do attempt a career change and it all goes belly up!

    if you are not sure your heart is in it dont do it!!!! its hard and a long way to the end, it would be awful to give up during. If you have AAT this is always there for you. Try the change you have nothing to loose you have AAT!!!

    The break from working/studying accounts may make you want to get bk into it but if not then enjoy your life doing something you enjoy!!! dont waste it!!!
  • Portsmouth_AATPortsmouth_AAT Feels At Home Registered Posts: 96
    sharonj wrote: »
    Hi

    I totally agree with the attitude you have and that everything happens for a reason and is most definately meant to be. If you work hard at something and give it everything you've got and it still doesn't work out then you move on. If you're not happy with your life, you try and change things for the better. Looking at things optimistically you will always be able to say you had the right attitude and gave it everything you've got. Optimists are usually hardworking and willing to give anything they feel passionately a try. If you fail, at least you tried.

    In answer to your initial thread posted, I too wanted a complete change of career. I'm only studying the advanced certificate at the moment, having worked in banking for 15 years in the city, I'm hoping that by the time my children have their own children (thinking about the long term future here), I hope to be working for myself at home and not having to travel up to town to work. I personally hate working in the city and cannot wait to be able to work away from the square mile. :thumbup1:


    it will happen if we make it!!!!:thumbup: and i think through wanting the change of career drives us more I chose this profession!!! therefore I suceed for me!!

    I too wil have a nice house in the country!! am also playing the lottery to try this lifestyle but even if i won i would set up a business or 2 to keep me busy!!!! lol (one day)
  • BluewednesdayBluewednesday Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 1,624
    Chris023 wrote: »
    I am at a bit of a crossroads. Accounts is all I know, I have been in it since my A-levels. I have just become MAAT. However I am finding accounts increasingly boring & it is not what I really want to do with the rest of my career. However how many of us actually have a job that we like and is interesting?

    I am unsure whether to try ACCA or not - my heart is not really in it but I feel that I don't want my AAT to go to waste...& ACCA (at least completing the fundamental level) would be an excellent thing to fall back on. If in a few years time I do attempt a career change and it all goes belly up!

    If your heart isn't in it - don't do it!!

    ACCA is such hard work that you need motivation to carry you through.

    I have to say I do have a job I love, you have to work for a long time so its really worth finding out what you do really want to do.

    I would concentrate on that if accounts is not it
  • blobbyhblobbyh Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,415
    sharonj wrote: »
    I personally believe that if you are 100% pessimist as you say you are, even if you totally look at everything with a pessimistic attitude you will never be happy with your life.

    I said I was a pessimist Sharon but didn't state I was 100% anymore than it'd be mad to be a 100% optimist. Being either will lead to inevitable disaster but at least the pessimist will arguably be expecting and maybe limit it. And if I'd had no outlook for my future at any point in my life, I'd never have retrained at the age of 35 in order to yearn for better things for the rest of it.

    Clearly we won't agree but I still maintain that if we lack the vital element of pessimism within ourselves, we miss the ability to change and make changes. There would have been fewer and less dramatic advances in science, medicine, technology and pretty much else that mankind has ever learned if brave individuals hadn't pessimistically questioned commonly held beliefs and opinions.
  • sharonjsharonj Well-Known Registered Posts: 166
    blobbyh wrote: »
    I said I was a pessimist Sharon but didn't state I was 100% anymore than it'd be mad to be a 100% optimist. Being either will lead to inevitable disaster but at least the pessimist will arguably be expecting and maybe limit it. And if I'd had no outlook for my future at any point in my life, I'd never have retrained at the age of 35 in order to yearn for better things for the rest of it.

    Would you say then that you are a pessimist if you are 51% pessimist and 49% optimist? I generally thought that if you were a pessimist you were a pessimist through and through, otherwise you would generally be referred to as a realist.

    I understand what you are saying about the improvements and discoveries within Science, Medicine etc, however do you not think that these 'brave individuals' weren't questioning Science in a pessimistic way but more looking at advancing on things in an optimistic 'surely we can improve things' way? Without believing things could improve, with a little faith and optimism, none of the advances that you mention would have happened.:tongue_smilie:
  • HawkHawk Just Joined Registered Posts: 3
    Deep!

    This is really deep thread so i thought i would add my 5pence worth. I am a christian and part of that is believing that there is a Gods plan for everyone. So i do agree that things happen for a reason. I think being pessimistic sets you up for a fall and in a way can become a self fulfilling prophecy. If you think something is going to fail before it has then you can inevitably (not sure that is spelt right) create the failure in itself. Hope that makes sense :001_tongue: it did in my head anyway.

    May be talking complete rubbish but I would rather stay optimisstic and live life with a smile anyday. :thumbup:
  • LeeS2009LeeS2009 Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 1,515
    Chris023 wrote: »
    I am at a bit of a crossroads. Accounts is all I know, I have been in it since my A-levels. I have just become MAAT. However I am finding accounts increasingly boring & it is not what I really want to do with the rest of my career. However how many of us actually have a job that we like and is interesting?

    I am unsure whether to try ACCA or not - my heart is not really in it but I feel that I don't want my AAT to go to waste...& ACCA (at least completing the fundamental level) would be an excellent thing to fall back on. If in a few years time I do attempt a career change and it all goes belly up!

    Chris it wouldnt be a wise move to continue with a qualification which will demand another couple of years of pretty tough studying from you if your heart isnt in it. If you say you are pie hot on your accounts...then why not look into doing a basic teaching course and carve out a career teaching AAT at a local College? Its a suggestion which will utilise what you have already learnt, continue your development, while exploring other career avenues. Re-evaluate your options later on...the important thing is to keep progressing and developing but to change directions to suit you and your needs.
    Hawk wrote: »
    This is really deep thread so i thought i would add my 5pence worth. I am a christian and part of that is believing that there is a Gods plan for everyone. So i do agree that things happen for a reason. I think being pessimistic sets you up for a fall and in a way can become a self fulfilling prophecy. If you think something is going to fail before it has then you can inevitably (not sure that is spelt right) create the failure in itself. Hope that makes sense :001_tongue: it did in my head anyway.

    May be talking complete rubbish but I would rather stay optimisstic and live life with a smile anyday. :thumbup:

    Even though labels have to be used in the common age to aid effective written and verbal communication I have to say -
    I hate labels.....labels are there to help a broad range of think the same, for people distinguish this/that, the brain learns by recognition of trends and patterns etc...increasing synapses along a neural pathway....these pre-concieved "traditional" labels help with this, which is why every label has an opposite to help people understand. Personally i think its an insult to a persons intelligence to adhere to them. In an intelligent conversation a pessimist and optimist can solve exactly the same complex problem using exactly the same methods to produce exactly the same results, but for different reasons.

    Great thread! we could continue wonderfully on religion :lol:
  • sharonjsharonj Well-Known Registered Posts: 166
    LeeS2009 wrote: »
    Even though labels have to be used in the common age to aid effective written and verbal communication I have to say -
    I hate labels.....labels are there to help a broad range of think the same, for people distinguish this/that, the brain learns by recognition of trends and patterns etc...increasing synapses along a neural pathway....these pre-concieved "traditional" labels help with this, which is why every label has an opposite to help people understand. Personally i think its an insult to a persons intelligence to adhere to them. In an intelligent conversation a pessimist and optimist can solve exactly the same complex problem using exactly the same methods to produce exactly the same results, but for different reasons.

    Great thread! we could continue wonderfully on religion :lol:

    I really like your point that a pessimist and an optimist could solve exactly the same complex problem using different methods to produce the same results but for different reasons. Not sure that I totally agree with the idea as pessimists have more chance of thinking themself into failure but being an optimist, I would definately like to hope this could happen, thinking optimistically of course. :thumbup1:
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