Is there any point in AAT?. Am I studying to be a 'Cowboy'

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Comments

  • RinskeRinske Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,453
    A-Vic wrote: »
    Why Not AAP Assiocation of Accounting Practitioners
    Because Aap is Dutch for Monkey...
    Can you imagine me telling my parents I'm not a qualified monkey....
  • A-VicA-Vic Expertise Guaranteed Registered Posts: 6,970
    Rinske wrote: »
    Because Aap is Dutch for Monkey...
    Can you imagine me telling my parents I'm not a qualified monkey....

    :lol: but arnt you tho?
  • RinskeRinske Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,453
    Oooh sorry spelling error, not = now.

    Well, I'm not a qualified monkey yet...
  • A-VicA-Vic Expertise Guaranteed Registered Posts: 6,970
    Rinske wrote: »
    Oooh sorry spelling error, not = now.

    Well, I'm not a qualified monkey yet...

    awww bless so in effect your still a little monkey
  • RinskeRinske Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,453
    A-Vic wrote: »
    awww bless so in effect your still a little monkey
    Always!
  • PGMPGM Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 1,954
    A-Vic wrote: »
    Why Not AAP Assiocation of Accounting Practitioners

    Might as we be a monkey if we get paid peanuts :)

    Other than that I think it sounds better!
  • smulxsmulx Settling In Nicely Registered Posts: 23
    Isn't AAT the only real entry route for people that aren't already working in finance? If anyone doesn't like only being AAT registered, they can just continue their studies further, or am I missing the point?
  • PGMPGM Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 1,954
    smulx wrote: »
    Isn't AAT the only real entry route for people that aren't already working in finance? If anyone doesn't like only being AAT registered, they can just continue their studies further, or am I missing the point?

    There are arguably better routes for people not already in finance.

    And yes, missing the point a little.
  • RinskeRinske Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,453
    smulx wrote: »
    Isn't AAT the only real entry route for people that aren't already working in finance? If anyone doesn't like only being AAT registered, they can just continue their studies further, or am I missing the point?
    They can indeed. But I think the current discussion has more to do with the fact they rather are monkeys than technicians and that a lot of employers undervalue AAT.

    I might be wrong of course.... Considering I'm studying to become a monkey, that wouldn't surprise me...
  • smulxsmulx Settling In Nicely Registered Posts: 23
    Ahh, suppose that's what I get for butting in half way through a conversation. AAT advertise their qualification as being amazing, and very highly valued, but once getting qualified I'm assuming that people are getting looked down on, as though it isn't worth anything?
  • LondinaLondina Experienced Mentor MAAT, AAT Licensed Accountant Posts: 812
    smulx wrote: »
    Ahh, suppose that's what I get for butting in half way through a conversation. AAT advertise their qualification as being amazing, and very highly valued, but once getting qualified I'm assuming that people are getting looked down on, as though it isn't worth anything?
    jow774 wrote: »
    I agree with the above but it seems to me that employers value AAT differently. Some employers ask for AAT qualified for basic purchase/sales ledger jobs
    PGM wrote: »
    I've got AAT and nearly ACCA, and I definitely think AAT is undervalued after studying both.
    But, it really does need AAT to lead from the top and make the brand be better regarded.

    That's my point, I think the AAT is undervalued and need to stand up more. Also most of the job adverts I see around, employers do required AAT for basic purchase/sales ledger jobs, maybe because they don't realise we can actually do more?

    AAT should stand for Association ACCOUNTANTS Technicians!
  • A-VicA-Vic Expertise Guaranteed Registered Posts: 6,970
    to me tho thats like saying an a-level isnt worth doing either there just there to get for entrance into uni but doesnt your future employer look at all your education when considering employing you?
  • LondinaLondina Experienced Mentor MAAT, AAT Licensed Accountant Posts: 812
    A-Vic wrote: »
    to me tho thats like saying an a-level isnt worth doing either there just there to get for entrance into uni but doesnt your future employer look at all your education when considering employing you?

    I think you are missing the point, we are not talking about the AAT as an entry for futher studies, but about the qualification on itself, a-Level are not advertised as a job position or a qualification for your future, like the AAT.

    The point is that we study 3 levels to complete the AAT and what we see afterwards is little recognition and job offer like posting invoices and basic stuff, that someone with no accounting qualification can still do (in my office, there is the PA of another company that keeps the accounts and she didn't study accountancy..).

    I wonder if all this effort we put in these studies is worth or not.
  • burgburg Experienced Mentor GloucesterModerator, FMAAT, AAT Licensed Accountant Posts: 1,427
    I think the AAT is mainly in a well respected place. It certainly was where I worked previously.

    Most of the public don't really know any of the differences. To most of them you are either 'chartered' or not.

    As for our reputation within the profession I think we are almost there. Yes the name isn't technically great but we do not have the level of knowledge of the 'chartered' qualifications. We are certainly more respected than those below such as the various bookkeeping qualifications. I am proud of my AAT qualification. I do market myself as an accountant based on public perception of the term and that it deemed a statement of the role I perform, being that of accountancy.

    There are those that have the AAT are are competent at performing basic bookkeeping and ledger tasks. Then there are those that are more than capable of undertaking accounts production and tax computations.
    Regards,

    Burg
  • AndypandyAndypandy Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 526
    It's definately worth it if you can do ACA afterwards - only 5 extra exams to do.
  • jow774jow774 Trusted Regular Registered Posts: 465
    But sadly, those sought after ACA sponsored positions are all too few.
  • smulxsmulx Settling In Nicely Registered Posts: 23
    probably a stupid question, but what exactly is a sponsored position? Is it a job that puts you through the exams?
  • jow774jow774 Trusted Regular Registered Posts: 465
    Yes, probably a bad choice of words though, lol.
  • blobbyhblobbyh Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,415
    Is AAT worth it? Of course it is though I suspect it's application on it's own (i.e. AAT qualified but no further) may be more appreciated in industry than it is in practice accounting where you would often be expected to study further.

    Ledger clerks who have studied AAT will have a better understanding of the mechanics behind the computer postings against those who just know how to press a button and let the software sort it out. This will prepare them better in any interview situation where the interviewer may be a chartered or QBE accountant and they can demonstrate understanding. Even if they do start in a ledger postion, they will still also possess the suitable tools to progress further up the accounting food chain when better situations arise.

    I don't understand the current thinking that you must work in an accounting practice or it's not worth doing it at all. There are immeasurably more industry, service and public sector potential employers than there are accounting firms and they all need accountants of some form or another if they intend to stay profitable. Many of them are run by qualified accounts/QBE's who respect the AAT as a sign of quality over those that don't have it. This isn't just my own opinion but based on comments from my own previous and current ACA qualified employers.

    It doesn't mean you're automatically gonna be employed since experience counts just as much but it's a head start over those who just have experience but little or no formal accounting training. The recession has also hopefully meant that many learning colleges and universities will now become more realistic when promoting the career opportunities for their graduates instead of promising them the earth as of past but that doesn't necessarily detract from the worth of the qualifications themselves.

    There have been many people on this forum over the past four years all asking the same question but to those that have achieved healthy careers during and after AAT, I'm not surprised nor am I particularly surprised for the thankfully few who seem to have failed. It's not about luck - it's about being realistic, pragmatic and bloody hard working.

    AAT is not the be all and the end all (as some deem it to be) but it is entirely merit worthy on it's own plus a good springboard for those who wish to go further.
  • PGMPGM Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 1,954
    Good post Blobby! As you mention, people do learn more about accountancy as they do AAT. So if an emplorer doesn't value AAT, hopefully they will the knowledge you posses.

    Although, is it more appreciated in industry? I'm in industry and it doesn't feel like its well known..

    But I am doing my bit and recommending it for purchase clerk positions. Were I do think it gives you a better understanding of the double entry transactions. Whereas chartered would be better for debating accounting treatment of various issues, which is irrelevant for those positions.
  • RinskeRinske Font Of All Knowledge Registered Posts: 2,453
    Well said Blobster!
  • stevefstevef Well-Known CarmarthenRegistered Posts: 258
    Brilliant Robert, you have summarised the very sentiments I have been trying to express.

    I am one of those people that has carved out a healthy career both during and after AAT without ever going anywhere near private practice or sharing a building with a Sage user. There is a good, varied and interesting life outside practice with lots of career opportunities. I have been a member of AAT before it became known as AAT (When it was TFA) and every employer I have worked for (always in local government) have respected AAT and appreciated its quality, it is used as a named qualification for both employing staff and giving training opportunities.

    Also please remember that AAT is our Association, if we think AAT should be doing something, if enough of us say it an we successfully lobby our elected Council members, it may happen.
  • SandyHoodSandyHood Font Of All Knowledge Registered, Moderator Posts: 2,034
    Well said blobbyh

    Long may the evidence of AAT success be seen by employers as a kitemark that an applicant can do what he/she says.
    Sandy
    [email protected]
    www.sandyhood.com
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