Level 5?

I'm almost positive that earlier in the year that I saw some form of documentation where holding the whole AAT qualification and a years worth of work experience was equivalent to a level 5 qualification.

It also saddens me that the AAT qualification is considered comparable to the first year of a degree, yet the first year of a degree is at A-level standard (level 2.5 - 3.5).

Do you think the second year of a degree course would be more appropriate? If it was, I could live with that.

A degree is level 6 for those that don't know. How can someone who holds a degree in drama, aromatherapy, golf studies be two levels higher than me?

I worked really hard for this qualification. Just doesn't seem fair?

Comments

  • NicF
    NicF Registered Posts: 108 ? ? ?
    A degree is level 6 for those that don't know. How can someone who holds a degree in drama, aromatherapy, golf studies be two levels higher than me?

    I worked really hard for this qualification. Just doesn't seem fair?

    Someone with a degree in drama, aromatherapy or golf studies may have a higher level qualification than you but it doesn't mean they are more qualified for an accounting job than you. I have an MSc in Computer Studies but this nothing in my job (project fincial analyst), hence why I'm doing AAT.

    N
  • NeilH
    NeilH Registered Posts: 553
    I'm almost positive that earlier in the year that I saw some form of documentation where holding the whole AAT qualification and a years worth of work experience was equivalent to a level 5 qualification.

    It also saddens me that the AAT qualification is considered comparable to the first year of a degree, yet the first year of a degree is at A-level standard (level 2.5 - 3.5).

    Hi

    The issue with the work experience making the qualification Level 5 is that there is no stardaization of the work experience. By this I mean that some peoples work experience could be at work equivalent to level 3, others at level 4 = nothing to actually raise the standing to level 5.

    On the UK qualification framework, 1st year degree is at level 4, 2nd year at level 5 and 3rd year at level 6. To confuse the matter slightly, universities refer to the levels as 1, 2 and 3! Also comparison according to level alone isn't a full compassion as the qualification level does not indicate the amount of study required for the qualification. As an example: AAT starts at level 2 and can be completed in a year part time, but there are other qualifications available at level 2 that take a year full-time.

    Neil
  • reader
    reader MAAT, AAT Licensed Accountant Posts: 1,037
    From what I understand:

    Level 2 = GCSE

    Level 3 = A-level

    Level 4 = 1st year of degree

    Level 5 = 2nd year of degree

    Level 6 = 3rd year of degree

    Level 7 = Masters

    Level 8 = Doctorate


    Also, I believe that:

    AAT Level 4 + 0 years experience = Level 4

    AAT Level 4 + 1 year of experience = Member of AAT (but still only level 4 qualification)

    So, essentially, you're correct, someone with a degree in "table football with wine studies" has a qualification two whole levels higher than you.

    Although I think it's a shame that the AAT qualification is only level 4 qualification there are ways to get to level 6 and 7.

    For example, I think AAT works in partnership the Northampton Business School regarding an "International Accounting" degree (if you want to take your studies to level 6).

    Alternatively, you could do something like ACCA and do their degree with Oxford Brooks, if you want to be a graduate.

    Have you finished level 4? What are you intending to do next?
  • SarahJS
    SarahJS Registered Posts: 273 Dedicated contributor ? ? ?
    I'm part way through level 4 now, and can state with confidence that this is nowhere near the equivalent level of the first year of my degree. At all.

    Strangely enough, I'd say the full qualification is similar to A levels, and even then I'd be being generous. Maybe I just did a hard degree.

    And to balance it out, I love the AAT qualification, and it's a valuable qualification which has probably got me a job (alongside the degree I have).
  • reader
    reader MAAT, AAT Licensed Accountant Posts: 1,037
    I agree with SarahJS to be honest.

    The first year of my degree involved seven 3hour exams, numerous 2,000 word essays/reports/projects and reading many more books.

    I think I've only read 5 books for AAT level 4.

    Again, to balance things out, I've learnt a lot from doing the AAT qualification, its helped me to get my foot into the accountancy profession and I'm glad I've nearly finished it.
  • SarahJS
    SarahJS Registered Posts: 273 Dedicated contributor ? ? ?
    It also saddens me that the AAT qualification is considered comparable to the first year of a degree, yet the first year of a degree is at A-level standard (level 2.5 - 3.5).

    Do you think the second year of a degree course would be more appropriate? If it was, I could live with that.

    A degree is level 6 for those that don't know. How can someone who holds a degree in drama, aromatherapy, golf studies be two levels higher than me?

    I worked really hard for this qualification. Just doesn't seem fair?

    I worked REALLY hard for my degree, by comparison this is a leisurely bit of light reading and a few quick exams done in your own comfortable pace. It would seem more unfair if my degree was devalued by giving this a higher level.

    I do understand your point about irrelevant degrees, but surely employers look at what a degree is in before choosing a graduate over AAT qualified? Being AAT qualified will not make you as skilled in drama/aromatherapy/golf as someone who has done a relevant qualification, but it should show you have a better knowledge of accounts.

    The level does not mean everything, and is purely a number.
  • NeilH
    NeilH Registered Posts: 553
    Hi

    As I put above, the levels alone don't really provide a good level of comparison. A year of uni study would normally require around 1200 hours of study. The AAT at level 4 has a guide of 350 hours.

    Neil
  • Daz1865
    Daz1865 Registered Posts: 67 ? ? ?
    Well, I have a degree and am only the ICAS project away from finishing AAT. I would disagree with a few of the previous posts and say that in terms of difficulty, the first year of my degree has been the equivalent to the final year of AAT.

    (Although AAT is a bit more straight forward as all the information is one text book, while in my degree I had to do a lot more indepedent learning. That makes it more labour intensive but not neccesarily more difficult.)

    One thing, is that I don't understand your inferiority complex? I think you are reading too much into levels. I would say that if you are AAT qualified and have the neccesary experience then nothing would really hold you back. You would be, in my eyes, more qualified than a fresh faced accounting graduate. You just need to be more confident in your abilities and what you know.
  • villapb
    villapb Registered Posts: 357
    Hi ive got 12 years experience in business and accountancy and only just completed aat. I work in a practise and the guy next to me has a masters degree, and spend most of my day helping him and answering his questions ie today how do i do prepayments on sage 50.
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