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How do I bypass the registration form - self study

TyJacTyJac Feels At HomeRegistered Posts: 42
Hello guys, I've been reading online and loads of people said that it's possible to self study without an learning provider. As I've limited money and I prefer to study at my own pace and looking to complete the whole level 2,3,4 within 1 year time. So how exactly do I register as a student on the aat website, without a learning provider? The part that says 'learning provider', do they actually cross reference it with the actual learning provider to check whether I'm really joined with them?

I'm planning to buy books and take exams as a private candidate at one of Kaplan's test centre in London.

Comments

  • JaffasGirlJaffasGirl Trusted Regular Registered Posts: 387
    I put BPP as I take my exams at their centres, you will need to register with a provider for a couple of the units e.g computerised accounting, so you can always pick the one you will most likely use for that.
  • TyJacTyJac Feels At Home Registered Posts: 42
    JaffasGirl wrote: »
    I put BPP as I take my exams at their centres, you will need to register with a provider for a couple of the units e.g computerised accounting, so you can always pick the one you will most likely use for that.

    So you saying that when I come to put who my learning provider is, I just simply put whoever I'm going to take my test with? In my case, it would be 'Kaplan', even though I won't actually pay for their learning service. Would this be a problem though? Like they would check up and cancel my membership, or strictly against their policy, taking legal actions against me?

    Some people say that it's possible to pay the test centre like BPP or Kaplan to mark your assessments, like the 'computerised accounting' module, is this true?
  • Fran0240Fran0240 New Member Registered Posts: 12
    I would really like to know the answer to this too:001_smile:
  • johnnyboy987johnnyboy987 Feels At Home Registered Posts: 36
    You would need to register with them for those particular units... Not just for the exams, but like registering to study them... But you won't need to buy the whole level, just the unit.

    Out of interest, I've seen it come up a few times in these forums and was wondering - if you study through the whole of the AAT in a short space of time (eg. A year), how much of the knowledge do you actually retain? Is it not the equivilant of cramming for an exam in school and forgetting everything?
  • TyJacTyJac Feels At Home Registered Posts: 42
    If you read my previous post, I mentioned that some people said it's possible to get those particular modules (project based) marked externally via a exam centre.

    If you take A-level for exam, it's possible to fast-track study it within 1 year rather than the typical 2 years study in college. It all depends on how much time you willing to put into your study and the timescale for each individual to retain information is different. Typical college timetable is too relax and study pace is slow. The way I see it, if you manage to cram it in, in a short space of time, it shows that you could take in information quick.
    You would need to register with them for those particular units... Not just for the exams, but like registering to study them... But you won't need to buy the whole level, just the unit.

    Out of interest, I've seen it come up a few times in these forums and was wondering - if you study through the whole of the AAT in a short space of time (eg. A year), how much of the knowledge do you actually retain? Is it not the equivilant of cramming for an exam in school and forgetting everything?
  • uknittyuknitty Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 591
    The difference between AAT and A Levels is that to complete the AAT qualification you will need to submit 1 years worth of work experience as well as passing the exams.

    If you are currently working in accounts and want to get exams out of the way as quickly as possible in order to gain a recognised qualification that supports your experience then go for it. If you are not currently working in accounts I would caution against completing too many exams without first securing any work experience as you won't be able to gain full membership based on exams alone, and many employers look for candidates who have experience in line with their exam qualifications.

    I have noticed a common theme in that people are excited about the AAT qualification and want to qualify as quickly as possible - but in terms of what employers are actually looking for, they really are not really that interested in how quickly you completed the exams, however they are interested in if you gained the practical experience that supports your studies.

    So, with that in mind, don't focus on how quickly you can sit your exams, rather focus on gaining practical experience that shows you can use the skills you are studying.
  • TyJacTyJac Feels At Home Registered Posts: 42
    Understood what you saying there, but for most people I believe their intention of self-studying rather than paying a learning provider is so that they could save money and complete it at a faster pace than the timescale recommended. This is so they can gain the initial stage of achieving something (qualification) in the shortest amount of time in order to quickly be able to find an accountancy job or for further chartered accountancy qualification purposes.

    For me my intention is to get the exams done asap and then be able to study ACCA, during then, I'll look for work experience of 1 year while studying.
    uknitty wrote: »
    The difference between AAT and A Levels is that to complete the AAT qualification you will need to submit 1 years worth of work experience as well as passing the exams.

    If you are currently working in accounts and want to get exams out of the way as quickly as possible in order to gain a recognised qualification that supports your experience then go for it. If you are not currently working in accounts I would caution against completing too many exams without first securing any work experience as you won't be able to gain full membership based on exams alone, and many employers look for candidates who have experience in line with their exam qualifications.

    I have noticed a common theme in that people are excited about the AAT qualification and want to qualify as quickly as possible - but in terms of what employers are actually looking for, they really are not really that interested in how quickly you completed the exams, however they are interested in if you gained the practical experience that supports your studies.

    So, with that in mind, don't focus on how quickly you can sit your exams, rather focus on gaining practical experience that shows you can use the skills you are studying.
  • JaffasGirlJaffasGirl Trusted Regular Registered Posts: 387
    My oly intentions when taking distance learning were that it was cheaper and more flexible than going to college. And by that I mean I can study when I want/have time and take my exams when I'm ready be that three weeks or three months.

    I don't think you should discount getting experience in early. You may find that employers will think that because you raced through the qualification you will get bored with the more menial jobs that can be involved in the entry level positions. And therefore not hire you. It took me two years to find ton entry level purchase ledger job and it has helped so much with my studies being able to relate what I have learnt back to real life, and believe me the text books are way simpler! B

    I have only just finished level 2, and that has taken me about a year distance learning because of money and getting time off work from my previous work. Also, be prepared to get a lot of nos when looking for work when starting ACCA, most places want people with experience, especially when you start getting to those levels of qualifications. Good luck though!
  • TyJacTyJac Feels At Home Registered Posts: 42
    How did you manage to get an accountancy job in the first place without qualification?
    JaffasGirl wrote: »
    My oly intentions when taking distance learning were that it was cheaper and more flexible than going to college. And by that I mean I can study when I want/have time and take my exams when I'm ready be that three weeks or three months.

    I don't think you should discount getting experience in early. You may find that employers will think that because you raced through the qualification you will get bored with the more menial jobs that can be involved in the entry level positions. And therefore not hire you. It took me two years to find ton entry level purchase ledger job and it has helped so much with my studies being able to relate what I have learnt back to real life, and believe me the text books are way simpler! B

    I have only just finished level 2, and that has taken me about a year distance learning because of money and getting time off work from my previous work. Also, be prepared to get a lot of nos when looking for work when starting ACCA, most places want people with experience, especially when you start getting to those levels of qualifications. Good luck though!
  • uknittyuknitty Experienced Mentor Registered Posts: 591
    You build your practical experience in line with your studies by doing voluntary or charity work. That is what I did and eventually it led to a job.
  • JaffasGirlJaffasGirl Trusted Regular Registered Posts: 387
    I worked in administration for about four years, and started the AAT because I wanted to move into accountancy. The job I have now were impressed that I started it off my own back and with my general attitude. They could see that I was ambitious and wanted to progress and I was given a entry level role in purchase ledger. If your keen and willing to learn I think most companies will remember you.
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