Aca

kjg-kj
kjg-kj Registered Posts: 68 ? ? ?
If I pass AAT, I plan to continue studying and move on to ACA.

If my employer was to pay for this and I study over say three years, does anyone know roughly what this would cost my employer per year?

Comments

  • alicemaylara
    alicemaylara Registered Posts: 259
    about £11000 over 3 years!
  • AdamR
    AdamR Registered Posts: 668
    Depending on their level of support, £11k and some! For me, the second level exams are costing my bosses at least £1,300 each by the time you add up tuition and accommodation and that doesn't even consider my salary! Six exams at £1,300 is £7,800, plus six exams from the previous level (of which I was exempt from five) - I could argue £700 each when a BPP course and hotel is considered, so another £4,200 and then you have the advanced stage, for which I don't want to even estimate a cost for!

    But as you can see, I've made £11k in just two years if done from scratch and as I said, there's also 2+ weeks per exam in time off that I still get paid for - all in all it's an awful lot of money! But while they want to pay it I'm not complaining!

    Hope this helps
  • You may be very lucky to find an employer that will pay for ACA study. I was under the impression that practices only pay for ACCA as it is more relevant to practice. I wanted to study ACA at one point but was told at interview that they don’t fund ACA as it more orientated to banking and large PLC firms.

    I believe that you are actually eligible for ACA membership after being an ACCA member for five years with three years practical experience and two referees. You also have to sit a competency exam. Details should be on the link below. :thumbup1:

    http://www.icaew.com/index.cfm/route/125720/icaew_ga/en/Home/Join_us/Join_as_a_CCAB_member/Follow_pathways_to_the_ACA
  • NeilH
    NeilH Registered Posts: 553
    Don Juan wrote: »
    You may be very lucky to find an employer that will pay for ACA study. I was under the impression that practices only pay for ACCA as it is more relevant to practice. I wanted to study ACA at one point but was told at interview that they don’t fund ACA as it more orientated to banking and large PLC firms.

    I believe that you are actually eligible for ACA membership after being an ACCA member for five years which three years practical experience and two referees. You also have to sit a competency exam. Details should be on the link below.

    Funding for training varies from practice to practice and can depend on what the practice wants you to do - some prefer ACCA others prefer ACA. Two of my previous bosses were ACA, one trained in a mid tier firm the other trained in a small/medium sized firm. A previous employer's audit firm preffered ACA, this firm was a small to medium sized firm, but no where near the "Big 4" size.

    ACA training can be expensive, however. Colleges tend to operate a different format whereby there may be a tuition, revision and practice phase combined into one longer course per paper - thus higher costs!

    Don Juan is right in that you can apply for ICAEW/ACA once you have been CCAB qualified for a minimum of five years. The exam consists of a work profile to demo. competances equivalent to the ACA final case study. However, it isnt an exam in the sense of a sat examination - rather the ICAEW examine (in the wider sense of the word) what your work experience has included.

    Neil
  • kjg-kj
    kjg-kj Registered Posts: 68 ? ? ?
    Thank you all for this information, it has been very helpful!
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