Shall I study for the ACCA qualification?

geek84
geek84 MAAT Posts: 568 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
Hi Folks

I've completed the AAT and still out of a job!! Some of my friends have suggested that I might as well study for a chartered course such as ACCA. Do you think it is worth while while I am out of a job or do you think I should spend more time job hunting? If I were to start studying for the ACCA, I would be around 50 years old when finished, and nobody would probably employ me!!

Thanks

Comments

  • CeeJaySix
    CeeJaySix Registered Posts: 645
    My personal view, and I know others will differ, is no. Yes it would show the drive and determination to get yourself qualified with no support; but does self-studying AAT not already show that? From my (granted, limited) experience in the finance industry, at this point experience is more important than more qualifications. Any practice will be happy to fund your further qualification if you're what they're looking for (I will leave the industry side for others to comment on). Therefore my view would be to spend the time and effort on tailoring CVs, cover letters and interview technique - I'd suggest with AAT and life experience behind you it's more the way you're selling yourself rather than any fault in yourself that's the problem. You *should* be very much more employable than the college/school leaver/graduates that you're in competition with for entry level jobs, you just have to make sure employers understand that!
  • geek84
    geek84 MAAT Posts: 568 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    Thanks CeeJaySix
  • sun123
    sun123 Registered Posts: 19 Dedicated contributor 🌟 🐡 🌟
    Hi Geek
    Here is same I have qualified AAT in July,Still no job,few interviews all end up in sorry letters. By the time you looking for job you can start doing ACCA. I already start doing ACCA. In my interviews I feel like ....AAT is not really consider as a professional qualification. Part qualified ACCA is much more considered than AAT. SO better to start doing acca asap and also keep looking for jobs,thats what I am doing.

    I agree with CEEJAYSIX about the work experience but need to find a job first to gain some experience.
  • geek84
    geek84 MAAT Posts: 568 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    Good Morning sun123

    Thanks for you reply.

    However, I presume I will have to provide the funding for ACCA study, if I don't get a job? That could be quite expensive !

    Even if I do start the course and finish it, I would still be faced with the same problem - I would be around 50 years old when finished, and nobody would probably employ me!!

    Any more suggestions of what you would do if you were in my position?

    Thank You.
  • Clarekaye
    Clarekaye Registered Posts: 307
    Geek..It sounds like you have already made your mind up.
    Is there anything smaller and cheaper you can do that wont be as big as ACCA but still shows your learning?
    And then if you get offered a job that will fund you they know your follow it all through?
  • geek84
    geek84 MAAT Posts: 568 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    Thanks Clarekaye.

    I might perhaps do a google search to find other courses that I could study.
  • Jo Clark
    Jo Clark Registered Posts: 2,525
    Manjinder have you considered studying for the ATT qualification?
    ~ An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest ~
    Benjamin Franklin
  • geek84
    geek84 MAAT Posts: 568 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    Hi Jo

    Yes I did consider the ATT. However:

    1. I don't enjoy dealing with tax.
    2. I don't have much tax work experience.
    3. There doesn't seem to be many jobs around which require a Tax Technician.
  • Thabo J Samuel
    Thabo J Samuel Registered Posts: 1 New contributor 🐸
    geek84: which country are you in?
  • geek84
    geek84 MAAT Posts: 568 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    England
  • geek84
    geek84 MAAT Posts: 568 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    Good Morning Folks

    Any more advice on my query?
  • Jo Clark
    Jo Clark Registered Posts: 2,525
    No! :001_tongue: The decision, as they say, is yours. You need to do what you want to do and what you think you will enjoy and benefit from. Why not try self studying one of the ACCA papers? The initial outlay/cost should not be too much. If you then decide that ACCA is for you, register as a students etc. etc. and off you go!
    ~ An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest ~
    Benjamin Franklin
  • Kris1990
    Kris1990 Registered Posts: 52 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    Don't put yourself down, I don't see how you've got a lesser chance of getting a job than someone younger than you. Say you finish ACCA when you're 50, you've still got a good 15 years to work until you look to retire, that's a hell of a long time IMO. If a company is looking for stability, I'm sure a 50 year old is a better option than someone in their 20's due to having more commitments etc If I was in your position I would sit 1 ACCA paper and see how I felt. You don't have to go to college/uni, just buy the books (approx Β£40) and sit the exam (approx Β£90). If it doesn't work out, you would of spent approximately Β£130 which is not exactly the end of the world :) Good Luck!
  • Makkusu
    Makkusu Registered Posts: 94 πŸ’« 🐯 πŸ’«
    Kris1990 wrote: Β»
    Don't put yourself down, I don't see how you've got a lesser chance of getting a job than someone younger than you. Say you finish ACCA when you're 50, you've still got a good 15 years to work until you look to retire, that's a hell of a long time IMO. If a company is looking for stability, I'm sure a 50 year old is a better option than someone in their 20's due to having more commitments etc If I was in your position I would sit 1 ACCA paper and see how I felt. You don't have to go to college/uni, just buy the books (approx Β£40) and sit the exam (approx Β£90). If it doesn't work out, you would of spent approximately Β£130 which is not exactly the end of the world :) Good Luck!

    Not to mention the Β£79 initial registration fee, and a more than likely 3 x Β£69 (I think) exemption fees bringing it up to Β£416. A decision not to be taken lightly.

    Buy a book first and read it's content, if you like the idea of studying you'll want to look at how many of these exams could you manage to take each sitting. Then estimate how many years it would take you, and how much it will cost. Then decide yourself if it's worth it (only you can judge how much you value your time).

    If you go ahead, then you register, pay exemptions, book exams. But only then.
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